No more sniffling, sneezing, itchy kids!

Preventing and Treating Your Child’s Seasonal Allergies

When springtime comes around, we want your kids to be able to play outside and enjoy the beautiful warm weather! But when your child suffers from seasonal allergies, outdoor play becomes much less fun. Did you know that seasonal allergies can be prevented and treated naturally with the help of a Naturopathic Doctor?

Why seasonal allergies?

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Seasonal allergies are the immune symptoms that develop with exposure to an environmental allergen, such as grass, pollen, weed pollen, tree pollen, animal dander, dust mites, mould spores, and more. In Canada, allergy season usually starts in April and can continue all summer and even into the fall depending on the type of allergy and the severity. By avoiding triggers, supporting the immune and digestive systems, decreasing inflammation, and consuming natural anti-histamines, we can see great improvements in allergy symptoms in children (and adults too!). Let me lay them out for you:

Avoiding Triggers

This can be the most challenging strategy with environmental allergies but the more information you can gather, the better you’re able to understand and avoid these triggers. 

Talk to an allergist (this requires a referral from your medical doctor) to get proper testing for your child. Figuring out your child’s specific allergy helps you better understand how to minimize their exposure to the allergen. 

Consider food sensitivity testing. Eliminating your child’s food sensitivity from their diet will support their immune system function, digestion, and decrease excess inflammation. The fewer allergens the body has to deal with at one time, the better. A Naturopathic Doctor can support you with getting testing, interpreting the results and establishing a supportive and appropriate diet for your child.

Supporting the Immune and Digestive Systems

Seasonal allergies are associated with an overactive immune system. Luckily, we have great options for balancing your child’s immune system. We can start with supporting the foundations of health, including sleep, stress, diet, and activity level. Then, we can consider the addition of the following two nutritional supplements. 

Vitamin D. Low levels of Vitamin D are associated with seasonal allergies. Proper supplementation can help avoid a deficiency and support the immune system. 

Probiotics. A large part of the immune system is located in the gut. Probiotics are an effective treatment for improving digestion and decreasing symptoms of seasonal allergies. 

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Decreasing Inflammation 

When the immune system becomes overly reactive, it can cause excess inflammation in the body. Focusing on your child’s diet with the following recommendations is a great way to manage inflammation and improve allergy symptoms. 

Omega 3 fatty acids. Aim for at least 3 servings of fish per week. It can also be beneficial to consider an additional fish oil supplement to get the therapeutic dose of omega 3 fatty aids.

Bioflavonoids. These are the colourful compounds in fruits and vegetables. Work on ensuring your kids get 5-8 servings of fruits and veggies daily.

Limit added sugar. Sugar decreases the immune system's ability to function and can be even more inflammatory. It is recommended that children get no more than the equivalent of 6 tsp or 25g of sugar daily. Check your food labels for sugar added - sugar comes in many different names and forms!

Consume Natural Anti-Histamines

Did you know that anti-histamines don’t only come in the form of a pharmaceutical medication? We can find them all around us! Three amazing natural anti-histamines are vitamin C, quercetin, and stinging nettle.  Vitamin C. Aim to give your child Vitamin C from whole fruits and vegetables or from an added supplement, as opposed to fruit juices (which are high in sugar). Fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin C include bell peppers, citrus fruits, and strawberries. 

Quercetin. This is a bioflavonoid found in most red, green, and purple fruits and vegetables, including apples, berries, tomatoes, and leafy greens. It is also available in supplement form.

Stinging Nettle. Consume nettle leaf as a tea for its beneficial effects of decreasing allergy symptoms. It has a mild flavour and is often well tolerated by kids. If not, you can try making it as an iced tea and add some honey and lemon for added flavour. 

As you can see, there are lots of natural options to reduce seasonal allergy symptoms in your kids! Also, many of these ideas are safe and effective during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Book an appointment with one of our naturopathic doctors for more information on how you can treat your allergy symptoms. We want to help you and your kids get outside and enjoy the sun this season!

DrEmilyCasey squareDr. Emily Casey is a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine at The WOMB Burlington.Through her own health journey, Dr. Emily has learned the importance of individualized treatment and healing the whole person. She believes strongly that your overall health begins with a healthy digestive system. Dr. Emily enjoys living an active life, including swimming and running, drinking tea, and she is always on the lookout for new and delicious gluten-free food!

Our Roots: Who Are We?

Why WOMB?

I think there comes a time in every person’s life when the age-old question starts to lurk in the back of their mind, ‘Who Am I?’ That nagging feeling that asks, now that I’m a parent, now that I have my dream job, now that I’m coming off of maternity leave, what defines me? Who am I becoming? Where am I going? IS THIS MY LIFE? 

Some would call this a crisis of the soul. Some would call this an awakening. Some would call this just part of life’s journey. Well, this is where The WOMB is in its life – on a path that twists and turns and sees something beautiful around every corner. Sometimes that path is strewn with rocks and sometimes it is as smooth as baby’s bottom (I couldn’t resist). Either way, the journey has made us sit back and ponder, “Who is The WOMB?” and “Why WOMB?”. And here is what we came up with.

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At its ROOTS, The WOMB grounds us. Its roots provide our foundation and nourish our vision and mission. They are our cause, our source and our origin of being. Today, these are our 5 core ROOTS:

1. LOVE & CONNECTION:

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Love and connection are expressed in our relationships with our family, our team, our community, our earth and most importantly with ourselves. Love and connection nourishes, nurtures, and supports these relationships through compassion, communication, kindness, respect, inclusivity, synergy, faith and trust. As Brené Brown says in her book The Gifts of Imperfection, “Love is not something we give or get; it is something that we nurture and grow, a connection that can only be cultivated between two people when it exists within each one of them – we can only love others as much as we love ourselves.” 

So find your connection at The WOMB, first with yourself through your yoga and meditation programs, counseling and healing services, then with your community in Emerging Mothers Groups, drop-in groups, fitness and workshops.

2. INSPIRATION, TRUTH & AUTHENTICITY: 

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Expressing and connecting to our individual nature and essence allows us to each grow, develop, learn and evolve into the people that INSPIRE our families, friends, community and especially our CHILDREN. With kindness and compassion, awareness, inclusivity, integrity and wisdom, we can inspire the next generations to be true to themselves too. This means being REAL. This means not only allowing ourselves to fail, but also accepting our failures as part of being human, and then evolving and learning from them. It means being courageous in times of transition (don’t we all know transition!), trying new things, being vulnerable and reaching out for support when needed. It means remembering that Facebook and Instagram are just “highlight reels” and that “sleeping through the night” often means different things to different people. It also means acknowledging that families come in different shapes, sizes and make ups, such as LGBTQ, surrogacy, adoption and mixed. So be courageous. Be your own kind of person, your own kind of parent, your own kind of beautiful. There’s lots of THEM but only one YOU. And what your family needs is YOU.

Connect to your own spirit in The WOMB’s yoga and meditation classes, understand your own individual expressions of being in Birthing from Within and HypnoBirthing® courses, gain wisdom in The WOMB Talks Pregnancy, Birth & Parenting workshops or just drop in for a tea. Oh! Maybe even a massage while The WOMB looks after your little one(s)!  

3. GRATITUDE & GIVING BACK: 

guatemala Woman and child

This one is big for us. The vision of The WOMB began with 2 women, but it has grown to encompass whole communities of love that have nourished us too! We are so grateful that you’ve not only given The WOMB your support, you have trusted us with the support of your families and referrals to your friends. You have also come together in times of need to support others in our community who are in of love and a helping hand. Because of your generosity and our desire to 'pay it forward', we’ve chosen to put together what we call our “Angel Fund”. It is a fund that sees the light in every darkness by supporting families with services that they couldn’t otherwise afford or access. It means being able to provide breastfeeding support to women in hospital ICUs, gathering resources for brave women in shelters who have left everything behind to escape an abusive situation, providing in-home counselling sessions through our Well-Mama Program with Counting Butterflies, and providing pelvic floor rehab to refugees without any means of payment. These are just a few examples of how The WOMB has helped in the past. But there is so much more we can do! Our founders are currently working with a group in Guatemala to open a home that would provide birth and postpartum support to women who have experienced rape and incest. Please contact us if you would like to support this WOMB initiative. More info is coming!

4. PRESERVING MOTHER EARTH: 

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Since I became a mother, it was as if a lion took over my psyche and changed the fire within me. I suddenly was protective with all my being. My children are my roots, my legacy, my life-giving aspect of nature and I was their sustainer of life. It’s marvelous to me that this is exactly how our earth must feel about us. She protects us by providing life-supporting air, nourishes us with water to hydrate and land upon which to sow our crops. Thus, at The WOMB we believe it is our sacred and divine duty to respect our mother earth, preserve her legacy, conserve her resources and keep it as clean as possible. We use hand towels at The WOMB, organic products whenever possible, cold water in our washing machines to save energy, recycle waste products and never forget to thank her loving and giving spirit. She in return provides us with health and nourishment! 

5. LEARNING & EVOLVING:idea

This root very much ties into our deep belief that when you know more, you do better. We acknowledge that learning is a life long process. It means growing in awareness, taking the opportunities for education, developing intuition, living by our own core values, and listening to our inner wisdom. The opportunity to learn and evolve is everywhere. From moments of complete epic meltdowns in the arms of your doula, to laughter and hilarity in an Emerging Mothers Group. There may be moments of seeking your heart’s deepest questions in childbirth preparation classes or moments of pure evidence-based treatments with your health care practitioner. The WOMB believes in the evolution of the whole person, so find your learning opportunities in the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual support The WOMB lovingly provides to you and your family every day.

So WHY WOMB? Well because The WOMB believes in YOU and your full potential. The WOMB believes in your flaws and your strengths, and loves you for both. The WOMB believes that you can evolve, grow, develop and BE your own person – just as it continues to grow, develop, evolve and support its own roots. So I’ll see you soon, right? I’ll be the one with the tea in hand and the sign over our door that says, “Free Hugs”. Take me up on it. 😊

AngieStenback3Angie Stenback is Co-Founder of The WOMB, a Birth and Postnatal Doula, Childbirth Educator, Pre- & Postnatal Fitness Trainer, mother to 4 amazing kids and wife. When not at The WOMB, she can be found most often in the hockey rinks, her "taxi" or the dance studio. She heeds her heart's call by practicing yoga, meditating, dancing or spending time amongst the trees on a hiking trek.

Pregnancy-related Pelvic Girdle Pain:

Embrace the Evidence and Move beyond Biomechanics

Originally published in the Journal of Yoga and Physiotherapy
Volume 3 Issue 5 - January 2018

Sinéad Dufour, Assistant Clinical Professor, School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, CanadaSubmission: January 17, 2018; Published: January 24, 2018*Corresponding author: Sinéad Dufour PT PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor, School of Rehabilitation Science, Director of Pelvic Health, The Worldof My Baby (WOMB), McMaster University, Canada, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

back pain pregnancy

Opinion:

Imagine you are 32 weeks pregnant with your first child and you start to have pain in the low back and pubic area when you change position, sit or stand for longer periods. The painmakes it very difficult for you to function and you worry about whether you can continue to work and manage your household.You are also concerned about the upcoming birth of your baby and whether you will be able to care for your baby, an often seemingly overwhelming task without having to deal with pain. Now imagine you have seen your health care provider and havebeen told that your pelvis is separating because of the “pregnancy hormones” and that you need to put up with this until after you have your baby, as “it will probably get better afterwards”. Imagine you are also told, to be careful because “your pelvis is unstable”. These are common words of advice or explanations pregnant women with pelvic girdle pain (PGP) receive from their healthcare providers, including physiotherapists. These words are not substantiated and do more harm than good.

Pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is defined as a specific type of low backpain that can occur with or without additional low back pain [1].Pregnancy-related PGP is a specific category of PGP impacting women in the perinatal period and differs in its etiology as it is related to pregnancy and associated biopsychosocial influences.It represents a prevalent condition with an incidence as high as 46-58% [2]. The cause of pregnancy-related PGP is complex and multifactorial [1,3]. Evidence has shown an alteration in motorcontrol in pregnant women [3] and more recently, central pain mechanisms have been considered and implicated [4-7]. As such,to appropriately address the complexity of pregnancy-related PGP, physiotherapists and others must both acknowledge and part with common yet unsubstantiated beliefs surrounding the concept of “pelvic instability” [8]. Instead, current advances in pain science support the notion that pregnancy-related PGP represents sensitization of the structures of the pelvis [4-7].Thus, attention must move away from biomechanics and engage the multiple underlying mechanisms such as the stress system (HPA axis) and associated coping, inflammatory load, status (HPA axis) and associated coping, inflammatory load, status of the gut microbiome and sleep quality to name a few [5-9]. Despite the evidence supporting the need for a biopsychosocialperspective, recent research demonstrates that when it comes to pregnancy-related PGP, physiotherapists continue to preferentially use a biomechanical approach [9,10]. Guidance for an evolved evidence-informed approach is available from the the most recent published CPGs for pregnancy related PGP [4]. From an assessment perspective, Clinton et al. [4] indicate the use patient reported outcomes as an important way to capture the various assessment domains relevant to pregnancy-related PGP[4]. Specifically, among other scales, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) is recommended [4]. The PCS has three subscales:- rumination, magnification, and helplessness and has been utilized in various populations, including the antepartum population [11,12]. Using an outcome measure like the PCS is important to aid physiotherapists and others in assessing the mental processing that is associated with pregnancy-related PGP. The significance of patients’ beliefs and perceptions about their pain and their pain experience has been well demonstrated across a wide spectrum of orthopedic conditions including in the antepartum population [13]. Perception of pain has also been linked to the development of persistence [14-16], an important consideration for pregnancy-related PGP.

preg relaxation

From a management perspective, it has been shown that pregnant women’s expectations of care are not met and that their knowledge about how to manage the condition is lacking [17]. Further, a recent qualitative study elucidated women’s experience of care for pregnancy-related PGP highlighting the importance of perceived hope and self-efficacy [18]. Thus cognitive care strategies that focus on pain neurophysiologyand stress response education [4,6], mindfulness-based stress reduction [19], and tailored exercise [3,4,6] are advocated.

Science has evolved and to clearly guide practice well beyond a biomechanical approach where pregnancy-related PGP is concerned. Physiotherapists well-positioned to educate PGP is concerned. Physiotherapists well-positioned to educate and empower women so they understand how to interpret and respond to the pain they are experiencing. Knowledge translation efforts to support the provision of evidence-informed care herein are needed.

References

1. Vleeming A, Albert HB, Ostgaard HC, Sturesson B, Stuge B (2008)European guidelines for the diagnosis and Treatment of pelvic girdlepain. Eur Spine J 17(6): 794-819.
2. Rost CCM, Jacqueline J, Kaiser A, Verhagen AP, Koes BW (2004) Pelvicpain during pregnancy. a descriptive study of Signs and symptoms of 870 patients in primary care. Spine 29(22): 2567-2572.
3. Stuge B (2012) Pelvic girdle pain: examination, treatment, and thedevelopment and implementation of the European guidelines. Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Women’s Health111: 5-12.
4. Clinton S, Newell A, Downey P, Ferreira K (2016) Pelvic girdle painin the antepartum population: Physical therapy clinical practiceguidelines linked to the international classification of functioning,disability, and health. section on women’s health and the orthopaedicsection of the American physical therapy association.
5. Bergström C, Persson M, Mogren I (2016) Sick leave and healthcareutilisation in women reporting pregnancy related low back pain and/or pelvic girdle pain at 14 months postpartum. Chiro& Man Ther 24: 7.
6. Smith MC, Ramirez LO, Clarke G, John FC, Higgins MF, et al. (2017)Stress reduction therapy improves symptoms of pregnancy-relatedpelvic girdle pain and reduces salivary cortisol. Irish Pain SocietyAnnual Research Conference, Aug 26th, Galway, Ireland.
7. Felice VD, Moloney RD, Cryan JF, Dinan TG, O’Mahony SM (2015) Visceralpain and psychiatric disorders. Mod Trends Pharmacopsychiatry 30:103-119.
8. O’Sullivan PB, Beales DJ (2007) Diagnosis and classification of pelvic girdle pain disorders – Part 1: A mechanism based approach within a biopsychosocial framework. Man Ther12(2): 86-97.
9. Shoskes DA, Wang H, Polackwich AS, Tucky B, Altemus J, et al. (2016) Analysis of gut microbiome reveals significant differences between men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and controls. J Urol 196(2): 435-441.
10. Vandyken C, Hilton S (2012) The Puzzle of pelvic pain: a rehabilitation framework for balancing tissue dysfunction and central sensitization - a review of treatment considerations. J Wom Health Phys Ther 36(1): 44-54.
11. Dufour S, Daniel S (2018) Understanding clinical decisio making: pregnany-realted pelvic girdle pain. J Wom Health Phys Ther IP.
12. Bergbom S, Boersma K, Overmeer T, Linton SJ (2011) Relationship among pain catastrophizing, depressed mood, and outcomes across physical therapy treatments. Phys Ther 91(5): 754-764.
13. Grotle M, Garratt AM, Krogstad Jenssen H, Stuge B (2012) Reliability and construct validity of self- report questionnaires for patients with pelvic girdle pain. Phys Ther 92(1): 111-123.
14. Vøllestad NK, Stuge B (2009) Prognostic factors for recovery from postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Eur Spine J 18(5): 718-726.
15. Noren L, Ostgaard S, Johansson G, Ostgaard HC (2002) Lumbar back and posterior pelvic pain during pregnancy: a 3-year follow-up. Eur Spine J 11(3): 267-271.
16. Ostgaard HC, Zentherstrong G, Roos Hansson E (1997) Back pain in relation to pregnancy: a six-year follow up. Spine 22(24): 2945-2950.
17. Crichton M, Wellock V (2008) Pain, disability and symphysis pubis dysfunction: women talking. Evidence Based Midwifery 6(1): 9-17.
18. Stuge B, BerglandA (2011) Evidence and individualization: Important elements in treatment for women with postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Physiother Theory Pract 27(8): 557-565.
19. Crisp CD, Hastings Tolsma M, Jonscher KR (2016) Midfulness-based stress reduction for military wome27: 557-565.n with chronic pelvic pain. Mil Med 181(9): 982-989.

Gratitude for the Gift of Life

A Blessingway Start

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Life is full of gifts. Receiving life in the form of a child, is one of the most beautiful of them. I have four of these gifts in my life and with each one, I’ve learned something along the way. And for each of these lessons, whether challenging or easy, I am grateful. 

My first son taught me about the unknown. Standing at the threshold of a new life I pondered: How do I give birth “the right way”? Is my relationship with my partner ready to be “ruffled” by a new soul in the house? When will my child arrive? Will I be a good mother? In the end, his gift to me was that of fulfillment – I was finally a parent. 

My second child, I will admit to you, was brought into the family so our first wouldn’t be an only child. I couldn’t help but worry that if something happened to us, our first would be left alone. We couldn’t do that to him. So, my second taught me “family”. He taught me that “special time” was time together – not time individually. We were a unit bigger than just me, my partner and a child. We were a pride, a gaggle, a herd. BUT I also learned that looking after two children is challenging (to say the least!) and can’t be done alone. You will sacrifice your whole being if you don’t have any supports or resources in place. You will need your circle of support to remind you that even in those moments when you believe with all your heart that “I wasn’t meant to be a mother”, they will be there to tell you, “Ya, I felt that way too!” 

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With the arrival of our third son, I relaxed finally into parenthood. My first two could play together and I could sit back with my newborn on my chest and just watch and spectate the beauty of their interactions and glory in different personalities and passions. I saw myself no longer as someone “trying” to be a mother, trying to meet someone else’s standards, to do it in a blogger, Baby Center kind of way. Instead I stopped caring what anyone else thought and listened to my own intuition and what was right for me. 

Having a fourth child just solidified that belief that intuition is the success to my parenthood. I know my children best (despite what google or someone in the grocery store says), I know their ins and outs and I know that I don’t need to force anything for them to grow, love and develop. I have said on many occasions that I wish everyone could have their 3rd or 4th baby first, to have the confidence in their heart to listen to their own wisdom and to relax into the process. So I’m writing this blog so that you can have a sample or starting point at which to begin to understand who you are as you become or grow into being a mother - a place to begin to listen to your own inner voice called intuition.

History has shown that in these beautiful times of planning, gestating and anticipating new life, people turn to things that have deeper, greater and more enduring meaning. As mothers and mothers-to-be, we stand at a threshold of unknown - searching books, sites and asking other mothers about “what to expect” physically, mentally and spiritually. Will I know how to do this? To birth, to be a good parent… Who will I be? What will the “new me” be like? 

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What you need to know first is that allowing the spirit of “who you will become” after your child’s arrival, is a gift – probably one of the most important for yourself. Opening your heart to the unknown and allowing the process of life to unfold in front of you can be both challenging and rewarding. With a baby coming, there is so much to worry about, so much to prepare, so much to buy and have ready, so much to know! Have you ever sat back and considered what YOU need to be a mother? Write it down. Move toward it. Have you sat in a quiet room, by yourself and listened to your inner voice and just followed it? Try it. Practice it. It will be courageous of you to see what happens when you follow your own advice. 

While you await the gift of your child, another way to receive for yourself and open to your new self is by celebrating the woman-you-are-to-become through a Blessingway or Mother Blessing. Traditionally, a Blessingway (in the tradition of the Navajo) or Mother Blessing (a north American term) is a birth ritual or ceremony that celebrates a woman’s passage into motherhood. The ceremony acknowledges the changes a woman is going through in the months leading up to her baby’s arrival, and the greater impact of birth and early parenthood on her, as a person. In a close circle of women, the mother-to-be is nurtured in storytelling, adornment, gifts, blessings and food. Bead bracelets can be made, which the mother-to-be will carry with her into birth as a reminder of the strength and support her circle of women sends with her. The group can hold a red string ceremony to connect each with the other as women, and when the announcement arrives that baby is earth-side, the red string around the participant’s wrist or ankle is cut and released free. From all of this, the mother-to-be comes away with a strong sense of belonging, support and confidence that she will need as she nears the birth of her baby and after her baby is born. 

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Chances are you have attended or have heard of a “baby shower”. This type of celebration is a wonderful chance to rain baby presents upon the family so they are prepared with the materials they may need for their child. A Mother Blessing can be another option or in addition to a Baby Shower. Celebrate and recognize the mother-to-be as she transforms and transitions. You don’t have to follow any set agenda or order. Mother Blessings can vary in proceedings and rituals, so choose what you would like to do in yours. You can make it as “North American” or “Granola” as you like. Receiving your gift of love, belonging and support will give you the confidence to listen to your inner voice and be the mother you were meant to be – one who can also teach your children to live the life of gratitude for their gifts and inner voice too.

AngieStenback3If you have any questions about blessingways or Mother Blessings, or would like to host one, The WOMB has space in Milton or Burlington for rent. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., cofounder of The WOMB and Doula can also help you facilitate the right ceremony for you.

5 myths to debunk that will help you go back to work and still breastfeed

It would be so nice if we could continue to stay home with our little ones, but for most of us, going back to work is a reality.

For many mothers in Canada, we are lucky to have one year of maternity leave before returning to work. But for some, they need to go back sooner and for those who do get the full year, they would like to continue their breastfeeding relationship. Many ask, “Do I need to wean just because I’m going back to work?” The answer is no. It is hard enough to be separated from your baby, so being able to breastfeed when you are together benefits both of you emotionally and physically. 

Here are my top 5 myths about breastfeeding and going back to work after the one-year maternity leave.

1. I need to stop breastfeeding when I go back to work.

Absolutely not! Yes, it may be a bit challenging at first to juggle getting back into the swing of things with working and continuing to breastfeed, but it is just an adjustment. Going back to work is an adjustment in itself anyway. The benefit of continuing to breastfeed, is that you can still renew that closeness and one-on-one time with your baby when you are home - which makes the adjustment of going back to work easier for both of you. 

A side bonus is that many children who will go to a daycare setting when mom returns back to work, will come in contact with new and unexpected viruses and germs. When you breastfeed, you pass on valuable antibodies to your baby through your breastmilk. So, although it is inevitable that your little one may get sick, they will most likely recover sooner or not get as ill if you continue to breastfeed. 

2. I will need to pump when you go back to work. 

Many women have a love-hate relationship with their pump and many haven’t pumped for months. They often wonder “When will I find time in my day to pump? Where will I pump and where will I store the milk?” Of course, this is always an option and you can speak with your employer about setting up a room for you to pump and for you to store your milk (it’s their legal obligation to do so) but you don’t need to pump. Many mothers will simply hand express a bit while away if they feel too full and just breastfeed when they are with their baby. Sure, the first few days when you go back to work may be tough and you may be a bit uncomfortable and leak a little. No problem, bring an extra shirt just in case, learn how to hand express and by the end of the week your body will adjust and you will be fine!

3. I need to start giving whole milk or formula when I’m away from my baby 

Many day cares are very accommodating with what you give decide to give your baby. If you have decided to introduce whole milk into your baby’s diet, then they can definitely provide that to your little one. But many families decide not to do whole milk or dairy and know that baby can get their fat and vitamins from food sources. There are many other options. Speak with your daycare provider about what will work. If you have decided to pump and provide that milk to your baby, you can do that. Working with a naturopathic doctor will also help you decide on alternative forms of milk such as almond, cashew, coconut, or rice milk to name a few. You can also just do water during the day and baby can just continue to breastfeed when you are together. 

4. My baby has never taken a bottle so I will need to introduce one.

This is not necessary at all. If you are going back after a year maternity leave, most one-year-olds will take a sippy or open cup. In fact, many day cares don’t want to have to deal with bottles and will encourage your little one to use a cup. Even if they never had, you’d be surprised how quickly our little ones pick things up when they are surrounded by their peers in daycare who are all doing the same thing.

5. I will need to wean breast feeds before I go back to work.

Not really. Just enjoy the time you have with your baby. By the time your baby is a year old, the number of feeds has usually decreased and on average, your baby may feed 4 times during a 24-hour period. Remember, when you go back to work you may feel full for a few days but your body will quickly adjust. And your baby will also quickly realize when they are without you that they cannot feed from you so they will find another option while you are away. 

Do keep in mind, when you and baby are together your feeding patterns may change. Many babies do what we call “reverse cycling” in which they tend to feed a lot overnight. This is usually temporary when you first return to work. Often its even your baby’s way of just staying close to you as they will miss you when you are gone. But again, your baby will quickly learn the routine. And on weekends, you can resume your regular feeding patterns. On Monday you may feel a bit full again, but your body will once again adjust! Our bodies are just so cool that way! 

Anita Arora is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant at The WOMB. Anita’s aim is to help mothers reach their feeding goals in a non-judgmental, accepting and natural approach. Anita sees women both in clinic and in the comfort of their homes to assist them with any and all feeding issues. Anita runs a Breastfeeding Café Drop In Group every month, and leads workshops for parents-to-be and mothers returning to work on a regular basis. Her next Breastfeeding and Back to Work workshop is Thursday November 2, 2017 at 10:30am at The WOMB. 

 

Sex After Baby: What everyone wants to know, but sometimes is afraid to ask!

Nelia DeAmaral, Registered Psychotherapist and Coach for Women, & Jenny Telfer-Crum, Pelvic Health Physiotherapist

 

Six weeks after you give birth, you will visit with your care provider. Maybe your care provider gives you a thumbs up to resume “normal activities” (including sex). Maybe your care provider checked that everything was healed, or maybe not. Were you or are you ready? Do you feel an obligation to become ready because your partner wants to be intimate again? Most women aren’t and if you are still finding yourself “not ready” a few months later, you are not alone. Partners often are given the impression that once the body is mostly healed, that sex can resume. 

Let’s talk about what sex after baby is really like. This topic comes up over and over in our sessions with new moms, who are almost afraid to ask, but really want to know how to deal with this change in their relationship. Mostly everyone wants to know if they are normal, if things will be okay, and how to stay connected to their partner during this change. 

If you aren’t quite ready, that’s okay. If you are looking for ways to return to intimacy after baby, we’ve listed that too! There are good reasons for how you feel. Below are some factors that might influence when you return to sexual activity with your partner, and some strategies for when and how you return to these activities.

Let’s start by setting some normal expectations for sex after baby. Your first several times being intimate again, will likely require lots of talking, adjusting, and flexibility. It will be a time of “figuring out” and “experimenting” - not hanging from the chandeliers (but it’s okay if it is!). So NO PRESSURE! You will likely need to slow everything down. Your body will feel different and it will be your first time being sexual with this new body & your first time being sexual as a mother! It’s important to take the pressure away that this will be amazing sex, or the sex you had before (at least initially).Your body has been through a major change, and your first few times of being intimate can feel awkward and different. Most partners are very happy to be supportive as you explore these new sensations and experiences.

It is common if…..

1. You feel Pain or Fear of pain or Tension in the pelvic area: 

Your 6 week “go ahead” just means is that your tissues have the integrity needed to withstand the friction and stretching that occurs with intercourse. But vaginal tissues are sensitive after birth REGARDLESS of whether baby is born vaginally or by caesarean birth, whether you have stitches or not.

Imagine you pulled your bicep muscles in your arm lifting something – our first instinct is to bend the arm and hold it close to us. This is a guarding response to keep up safe and prevent further injury when our tissues are fragile and stretched. We rest the muscles for a couple of days, and without even thinking about it we will rub our arm where it hurts – this provides our tissues with normal sensory input (touch, friction, pressure) and helps us check in as to where any tenderness is and how it is changing. Then over the next week or two we will gradually start using our arm again to lift things, testing out how much we can lift. Within a couple of weeks you are pain free, doing your usual activities.

At the perineum and vagina, the same healing process occurs. First our muscles tighten in a guarding response to being stretched or torn (and in the case of caesarean births, tighten in response to neighbouring muscles being impacted). However, at the pelvic floor and perineum, we often don’t get the same normal input we do at other parts of our body. We aren’t often touching or rubbing this area apart from toileting, and women often don’t consciously relax the pelvic floor over time. So what we can have are tight and sensitive tissues around the entrance to the vagina.

Learning to relax your pelvic area again.

Fortunately, most women do very well with pelvic floor corrective exercises focusing on “reverse kegels”, which is teaching the pelvic floor how to RELAX appropriately. Gentle touch in this area can also help desensitize these tissues and bridge the gap between recovering from birth to returning to intercourse. Our Pelvic Health Physiotherapists can help identify where any tension or sensitivity is harboured in your muscles and how to work towards recovery. Research has shown that child birth, even with tissue trauma like an episiotomy, is not linked with long term impacts on sexual function.

How to talk to your partner: Talk to your partner about the worry, and keep talking even during sex. Notice when you tense up, practice relaxing with your breath, and ask for what you need (eg. slow down, pause, or stop for today). 

Remove the pressure for penetration right away. Many women find it helpful to use lubricant, or have touch without penetration for arousal or even orgasm. Try a different position such as a position of power (ie. woman on top) to control rate and depth of penetration.

Some women experience physical and emotional trauma during birth, and despite their efforts, their body doesn’t feel safe letting go. A couple of sessions with a counsellor can help you sort through feelings of self-blame & anxiety. The WOMB offers specialized support for healing from a difficult birth.

2. You feel too exhausted to have sex

This doesn’t mean you don’t love your partner or that your relationship is doomed.

It can be difficult to feel the desire to be intimate, when you are in the most exhausted state of your life! Early parenthood is a time of choosing between your various survival needs. Your frequency of sex will likely decrease because that’s what happens when we are exhausted! 

Give yourself time. It is normal for babies to have erratic schedules. Sometimes more sleep isn’t an option, but studies show that meditation and relaxation can have similar benefits to more sleep. Try these simple, and short meditations for moms and meditation for sleep. Many partners experience feeling loved through intimacy. What other ways do you and your partner feel loved? Maybe something you each already do without words or touch? 

3. You feel too stressed to have sex

The stress of being a new/new again mother is tremendous. You mind is busy and you might feel like you are constantly “on call” and ready to respond to your baby. Sexual arousal is governed by our parasympathetic nervous system, aka “rest and digest” system. When we are stressed, the increase in cortisol (stress hormone) decreases oxytocin (aka hormone of love). Stress also increases tension in the pelvic floor muscles - which can loop back up to tissue sensitivity. 

Focusing on bringing down your overall stress levels might make a little more space for feelings of intimacy. Either way, it will help you cope with the challenges of mothering with greater compassion and presence. Simple awareness practices can help you see yourself with more compassion, which is a proven way to calm down the fight or flight. Try this meditation for stress and anxiety. You can do it anytime. It’s quick and you can even do it while you feed baby. 

4. You feel touched out or too “called on” as an introverted mom

Being a mom, especially if you are an introvert, can leave you feeling like you have no time to be alone and recharge, which can be extremely draining. Some women don’t feel the need or desire to be touched especially because holding baby increases our oxytocin levels on it’s own, so you don’t feel you need to get that affection from your partner. 

It might sound counter intuitive to building intimacy, but sometimes you might just need some time alone. You’ll be surprised how much even 20 minutes can help you feel like yourself again. Time alone is especially helpful if you can step away and allow your partner to parent in their own way and you have specific and set times when you can expect a break. Read more about ways your partner can support you in the article A Mind-Reading Guide for New Fathers.

5. You don’t really like your partner right now or you feel like he’s a roommate

The demands of the early months of parenting can leave you both feeling a little disconnected or unusually irritated with each other. Virtually everyone goes through this. Know that you are not alone. Find small ways to connect that are doable for both of you. Many couples find that a couple of sessions with a counsellor or coach can help get them on track with communication and bonding. The WOMB offers sessions for couples. 


7. You don’t feel connected to your body, don’t love your body or wonder how your partner will love your body again: Who’s body is this anyway? 

Maybe you feel like your body has gone from being yours to providing a function for your baby, whether it’s feeding or caring for baby in other ways. It’s ok not to love your body. Try making friends with your body. Treat it as you would a tired, hardworking friend. Be compassionate with yourself. Many clients describe the relationship to this new body as an acquaintance or even a distant “facebook friend”. Talk to other women. It will help you realize that “bouncing back” is a myth.

Some women find themselves hiding their bodies from their partners for fear of judgement. Talk to your partner about this. Honesty is a true form of intimacy. What if this stage was a chance to be loved when you aren’t perfect? Imagine allowing your partner to love you, just as you are right now? Intimacy is more profound when we allow ourselves to be seen in our imperfection. For more on embracing imperfection look up the work of Brene Brown, a renowned researcher on whole-hearted living.

8. Mood Changes

This is a complex interplay of the physical, social and psychological factors listed above. You will feel good again! Medication given to help aid in post partum depression (SSRIs) can also dampen arousal and desire. It’s normal to feel sad, anxious and not like yourself. If you find that you are feeling this way more often than not, seeking support can make all the difference. Even just feeling normal and being understood goes a long way. 

Here are some quotes from fellow mothers in the Emerging Mothers Group in response to the question, “What would you tell your daughter at this stage of mothering if she felt as you do”?

“This experience makes you part of a community of women”

“Don’t be so hard on yourself”

“You are right where you need to be at this stage”

“You have done something amazing - a miracle. Give yourself time.”

“Let in your partner’s hugs. You don’t have to hide”

We hope this article was helpful. So much can be done to make this transition easier for women and families. Feel free to contact us to talk more or to book a time.

Sincerely, 

Nelia DeAmaral, RP

Registered Psychotherapist and Coach for Women

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

647-456-2229

 

Jenny Telfer-Crum, PT

Pelvic Health Physiotherapist

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Counting Butterflies: The Beginning of my Postpartum Journey Towards Hope and Change

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I sat on a cardboard box in the middle of our new living room. Beside me was the portable crib my newborn daughter slept in. Her tiny mouth curled slightly to one side; she was in deep slumber. I sighed in relief, beckoning a feeling of satisfaction to mark this moment. But instead, a feeling of overwhelm took its place.

I scanned across the room at the sea of boxes that harbored all of our possessions- remnants of my old life. I wanted to be a ‘good mom’ and get some unpacking done while my daughter slept. Wasn’t that what all the ‘good moms’ did— work while their child slept? Wouldn’t that help me maximize bonding time with my daughter? I had to be more present with her today and less stressed, and that would help my milk supply- wouldn’t it?  

My body ached and my head spun with self-judgement. I knew I had so much work to do, but what I truly wanted to do was curl into my bed and wake up when my husband got home.  In that moment, a wave of reality settled in: I was a new mom. In a new house. In a new town. In the middle of nowhere, all alone. Sitting on a box containing the only passageway back to my old self. 

And I panicked.

My secret had revealed itself: This was my new life, and I wasn't sure I wanted it. My secret rose from a place so deep, I barely recognized it was my own.   This revelation took my breath away; leaving streams of tears in its place. 

Through blurry-soaked eyes, an object in the flower garden caught my attention. Wiping a stream of tears away, I saw that it was a butterfly; it was so beautiful it looked as though it was from a different world. And there it was, in my garden. My elegant guest.  I ran to grab my phone to take a picture, and as I returned, two more landed on the flowering purple bush.  

When Isabella woke from her nap, I scooped her up and fled to the garden to count more. We counted 23 butterflies in the garden that day. And the next day we counted 33.  That summer, as we nested into our new home and lives, I would stop and count butterflies along the way.  On my hardest days, I would find moments of joy, sometimes fleeting seconds, counting butterflies in the garden- and these moments gave me hope. 

I would like to say that my healing and growth during my emergence into motherhood simply came from counting butterflies that summer (there is something magical, and comforting, in the notion that growth can occur so simply). But my growth into the resilient wife, mother, and woman I am today also took courage, strength, and support. My resiliency has become my travel-companion along my life-long journey of growth... but to this day, I still stop and enjoy counting butterflies along the way.

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Michelle Brans, MACP is a published Author, Teacher, and Child & Family Psychotherapist specializing in Motherhood and Holistic-Integrative Child and Family Mental Wellness.  She is the Founder and Clinical Director of Counting Butterflies, which is guided by The Butterfly Prescription to Mental Wellness ® to nurture the transformation and resilience of children and families, by fostering a deep connection to ones' self, others, and the natural world around them. She holds a Masters in Counselling Psychology, and has received training and certifications in: Emotion-Focused Couples & Family Therapy; Mindfulness & Compassion-Based Therapy; Marriage, Family, and Cultural Systems; Attachment & Developmental-Based Care; Holistic-Integrative Wellness; Ecopsychology and Nature-Guided Therapy; and Women's Wellness. She lives with her husband, daughter, and animal-family on their ever growing Green-Care Farm & Homestead in rural Ontario, Canada. Visit her and her team at countingbutterflies.com.

 

Michelle and her team are honored to have partnered with The WOMB to offer Therapy & Support for new Mothers on their journey towards wellness through the Wellmama Home Session Program. We are currently working on an exciting Online Parent Education & Therapeutic Group for Emerging Motherhood. 

Michelle will be sharing more of her story, and other stories of Motherhood, over the coming months.  Inspired to sit with Michelle and share your own story of hope and change during Motherhood for her program? Connect with Michelle at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..counting-butterflies

 

 

Feeling stuck on the worry treadmill?

Find your “anxiety antidote”

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A lot of my work with women revolves around the powerless, and sometimes overwhelming experience of feeling anxious. My clients worry about making mistakes, they worry about being good moms, good employees, they worry about their health….they worry about missing out….they worry. Women often feel robbed of the ability to enjoy the moment, despite a deep longing to feel joy.

There is a difference between worry and anxiety…and we can move back and forth between them.

I want to tell you that you deserve to feel happy. You deserve to feel good enough. You deserve to be free of the debilitating anxiety that comes from constant second guessing, and self-criticism. Your children and family deserve to have a mother who doesn’t carry the world on her shoulders. You are so worthy, my loves…. so worthy.
 
How is worry and anxiety affecting your life? What would your family notice if tomorrow morning, your worry brain took a rest….what would be different?

I help clients find their personal anxiety antidote. I don’t suggest that you just try some generic relaxation or meditation or even just “think positively”. There is a reason that anxiety is there. Anxiety happens when something inside of us is asking for attention. Something inside is asking to be heard, seen and addressed. Sometimes we think we know what it is, so we solve the first thing that comes to mind, but we still feel anxious. I call this the anxiety treadmill! How the heck do you get off without making yourself crazy?
I want to tell you my approach to anxiety. I treat it as a super power. We use this obsessive focus and intense drive to create good feelings!  Did you know that Nasa often prefers to hire anxious people? They are great people, with lots of focus-power. But imagine if they could never turn off that ability? What a terribly stressful existence.

Finding your antidote….

Just for now, try not to “get rid of” the thoughts and feelings. Let’s set out the welcome mat, offer it a cup of tea and an open space. Let’s explore, “What is needed here?

Is there something in your life that you just can’t seem to let go of, even though you have tried? Something that your partner or family think you “make a big deal of”? A situation that you can’t seem to find clarity about, but it’s robbing you of joy in the moment?

Ask yourself a few questions to help identify your antidote:

  • Looking for exceptions to the problem. Getting away from all or nothing thinking: When is the “problem” less bad? What are you doing at these times and who are you with? What are you receiving or giving during these times that seems to help? How might this help you with your current situation?
  • Seeking help: Who can help you with this problem? What has stopped you from reaching out? How easy would it be to reach out?
  • Identifying your harmful self-talk: What belief about yourself is fueling your worry about this situation? For example, what are you telling yourself this means about you as a person that you are having this challenge? Is this absolutely true? What’s more true about you?
  • Giving yourself credit: Even if this situation isn’t perfect, and you are learning, what do you appreciate about how you are handling this? List at least 3, and for extra points ask your partner or friend what they see you doing well.
  • Surrendering control: Are you trying to make the situation perfect? … Trying to meet a standard that seems impossible (even if it is your ideal)? If so, acceptance might be your antidote. Ask yourself, what’s good about this situation? How might I see it 10 years from now?

Send me your thoughts! I would love to hear how these questions open up some new options or perspectives for you!

If this approach speaks to you, drop by for a session or 2. Many clients find that this allows them to experience an anxiety “re-set”. They gain a deeper understanding of where the worry is coming from, get some tools, and off they go. Simple…yes, brave…yes…empowering…yah baby! Lets talk! Do it for yourself, for your children, for your partner, for your family. You deserve it! xoxo

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Neliaheadshot4

Nelia has been coaching women during life changes & challenges for over 20 years. Her unique approach helps you approach life challenges with greater clarity, confidence & compassion. Integrate body, mind and spirit through various tools ranging from mindfulness practices, mind-body awareness, and concrete solution-focused coaching. Nelia is also an advanced Birthing from Within Mentor, Certified Doula with CAPPA Canada and a published author (Bearing Witness, Joyful Birth, Lamaze: Giving Birth With Confidence& Sage Magazine). She is also a trainer offering professional development locally & internationally on utilizing mindfulness-based strategies to help facilitate change. Book a session with Nelia!

Three things every birth needs

A Birth Doula answers the Partner's questions

Stanleybirth31Photo credit: Kieran Darcy

Over the past 5 years, I have had the honour of walking alongside so many wonderful families all over the GTA as they welcomed their awesome babies. It is my dream job (although it doesn’t feel like a job!) and I am so thankful for the many moms, dads, partners, grandparents and extended families that have trusted me over the years. As people find out more and more about birth doulas, the most common questions I get are ‘what does a doula do”, “what’s the difference between a doula and a midwife”, and “what about the dad/partner? What role will they have if you are also there to support the birthing mom?” All of these are great questions! But I have to say my favourite question was asked early on in my doula career by a hands on partner who wanted to know “What are the 3 things you use at every birth?”

He asked this question because he had taken lots of classes and read lots of books and felt that he was pretty well versed on how to support his wife. But, due to all of his knowledge, he also felt that he wasn’t trained specifically in the ebbs and flows of birth and wanted to know what role on their team I would uniquely fill. I LOVE this question as it is one that most people I meet with want to know but don’t think to ask.

So, here is my list of the 3 Things That I Use At Every Birth. 

#1: My Voice

During birth, your senses as the labouring mother are all heightened. And as labour progresses and gains in intensity each mother needs to find her own rhythm and ritual to aid her in breathing and letting tension go through each contraction. This is where I come in. I use a variety of gentle, guided relaxation breathing prompts as the birth sensation begins, builds and then recedes. I use the knowledge that I’ve gained in my prenatal visits with moms to use words and phrases that would best suit and motivate her. Although I do not teach Hypnobirthing or Hypnobabies, etc, I am trained in stepping in and supporting a mom who has taken these classes and wishes to use these techniques. I believe that, although there are some similarities to how each birthing mom needs support, that each birth is unique and specific to each mom. So, I pride myself in my adaptability to support every mom where she is; not to guide her to where I think she should be.

Where the partner fits in

As I am guiding mom in the breathing and relaxation techniques, this is where your parter shines! Your partner knows you better than anyone in the room. Your partner loves you more than anyone in the room does. And it is this connection with you that has amazing benefits! Oxytocin is the natural love hormone that is necessary for birth sensations to begin and to build. Who better to help foster an oxytocin friendly environment than your partner? Often partners aren’t sure what to say and how to specifically guide you through each sensation.  That’s the benefit of having me there! :) I can support mom in the ways I am trained to, and your partner can, with a touch, a presence and words tell you how amazing you are, how strong you are, and how they can’t wait until your baby is here.

#2: My Hands

Stanleybirth1Photo Credit: Kieran Darcy

How to provide hands on support for a labouring mom was a key part of my doula training. There are many different positions that not only support mom and give her some relief, but are also great positions for baby as they make their way to her arms.

Applying counter pressure via a double hip squeeze during each sensation is something that most moms absolutely love at some point during their labour. As baby makes their way out of the uterus and into the birth canal, mom can often feel more pressure in her lower back. This is where applying sacral pressure to her sacrum (located in the middle of her back, at the very bottom) can greatly assist in comfort for mom. I also have a rebozo (a long flat piece of fabric) that I can use to bring comfort to moms and also can be used to aid in babies positioning during labour. Having experienced labour and childbirth personally four different times has also heightened my senses and intuition of what may give relief and support to a mom during each sensation. Often something as seemingly innocuous as a gentle massage on mom's back in between sensations can help her greatly in getting into her rhythm and ritual mindset. I’ve often gone from performing the double hip squeeze to a rhythmic massage on her back and if I stop to take a drink, mom will turn her head and say “Please keep going! That helps so much!” :)

Where the Partner Fits In

Similar to how the parter can provide support with their words, your partner's touch can bring a huge amount of relief and reassurance. I love to show partners how I do certain counter pressure techniques and love when they gain confidence as they do them. I’m a visual learner and have found that a lot of partners are too. They often watch for the first little while and then when I suggest they step in and try, they are quick to learn how to do it. Aside from the technical moves, having your partner right beside you, holding your hand, stroking your hair or face, or giving one of their awesome back or foot rubs can bring amazing support and relief as you labour.

#3: My Patience (Holding Space)

Just like it took 10 months for your babe to grow and develop, birth can take time. Your body may have a few starts and stops over several days (or weeks!) as it preps for active labour. This pre-labour and early labour stage can be emotionally and physically draining on both mom and partner. I make it a high priority prenatally to really go over the importance of patience during this stage. I make it a point to simply BE with moms and partners during this stage. This may be to just listen, or it may be to encourage them to shift perspective - to make these next few hours and/or days before babe, a special bonding time with just them - to see how special this time is..the time between ‘almost and not yet’, and to hold space with them there. Then once labour actually begins and babe is ready to get things moving and I am on my way to them, I am very conscious of the need for me to model patience for them, and to be in tune enough to recognize the moments when my voice or my hands aren’t needed...that the greatest tool in some moments of birth is simply holding space.

And finally as baby is birthed and mom and her partner finally get to see and hold and kiss and love their new sweet baby, I quietly take pictures and videos of those amazing first moments. And as much as possible, foster an environment in the room that respects those first incredible and life changing moments.

Where the Partner Fits In

stanleybirth2 1Photo Credit: Kieran Darcy

The most common thing I hear partners say at births or prenatally is “I just want to help her.” And it really wasn’t until I became a doula that I fully appreciated how difficult and emotionally draining the role of the support person could be. And that is amplified 1000% for your partner as they love you and it can be so difficult to see the one you love in pain. And because of this enormous love and concern they have for you, sometimes it is difficult for them to remember what your birth wishes are - especially when all they want to do is take your pain away. But once your partner is able to see the tremendous value in simply holding space for you and simply BE by your side, it’s really amazing to watch what happens. It empowers the birthing mom in an amazing way! She can "read" her partner better than anyone else, so when her partner's face is lined with worry or doubt, she can see that. But, when she sees her partner calmly and confidently just BE-ing, the calm and confidence transfers to her and empowers her to trust her body.

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So those are the 3 things every birth needs! I have many other tools that I bring and use at different births and during different stages of labour, but these three things - My Voice, My Hands and My Patience are the 3 that I use every single time.

AngieStanley

Angie Stanley is a Birth Doula. She is passionate about supporting women and families and has worked with various non-profit organizations over the past 15 years.  She truly believes that the pregnancy and birthing stages are some of the most life changing and special times of a woman's life.  She considers it an honour to be present to walk alongside women and their families at such a special stage of life. Setting up a FREE consultation with a Birth Doula is easy! Visit us here!


Get in touch! Give us a call at 905.842.2434, or click here to send us an email. 

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